Background Image Background Image Background Image
background image

CHAN 10183
Star    2 Ratings
Log in to review this disc
Background Image Background Image Background Image
background image
Chandos Movies Logo
CHAN 10183
The FIlm Music of Dmitri Shostakovich, Vol. 2

The Film Music of Dmitri Shostakovich, Vol. 2

The Classical Shop
release date: March 2004

Originally recorded in 2003

Artists:

BBC Philharmonic


Vassily Sinaisky



Venue:

Studio 7, New Broadcasting House, Manchester



Producer:

Brian Pidgeon

(Executive)

Mike George

(Recording)

Engineer:

Stephen Rinker



Record Label
Chandos Movies

Genre:

Orchestral & Concertos


Film & TV Music

Total Time - 65:50
Background Image Background Image Background Image
background image
Customers who bought this album, also bought...
CHAN%2010023.jpeg
The Film Music of Dmitri Shostakovich, Vol. 1
CHAN%2010361.jpeg
The Film Music of Dmitri Shostakovich, Volume 3
CL%201250.jpeg
Music for a Tudor Court
CHAN%2010349.jpeg
Alwyn: The Film Music of William Alwyn, Volume 3
CHAN%209959.jpeg
The Film Music of William Alwyn, Vol. 2
CHAN%209851.jpeg
The Film Music of Sir Malcolm Arnold, Vol. 2
CHAN%2010368.jpeg
Vaughan Williams: The Film Music of Ralph Vaughan Williams, Volume 3
CHAN%2010244.jpeg
Vaughan Williams: The Film Music of Ralph Vaughan Williams, Volume 2
GM%207351.jpeg
Amy Beach - Piano Music Volume 3
CHAN%2010336.jpeg
Korngold: The Film Music of Erich Wolfgang Korngold

Scroll Scroll

background image
SELECT YOUR MUSIC FORMAT FROM THE OPTIONS BELOW*
mp3question marklosslessoff  
*when you purchase a lossless format, we include the MP3 free of charge
Please Note: On Mp3 format an unavoidable click may be heard on segue track breaks, to avoid this issue please select lossless
 
DOWNLOADS
Buttonbooklet

The FIlm Music of Dmitri Shostakovich, Vol. 2

 

DMITRY SHOSTAKOVICH

(1906-1975)
Select Complete Single Disc for
   
 

Suite from 'The Golden Mountains', Op. 30

14:24  
  Incidental music to the film by Sergei Yutkevich  
1 I Introduction. Moderato 1:21
2 II Waltz. Andante - Più mosso 4:48
  Fugue. Largo - Allegro]  
3 IV Intermezzo. Andante - 4:01
4 V Funeral March. Largo - 2:12
5 VI Finale. Largo 2:00
   
 

Suite from 'The Gadfly', Op. 97

42:20  
  Incidental music to the film by Alexander Faintsimmer  
6 I Overture. Moderato con moto 2:45
7 II Contradance. Moderato 2:46
8 III Folk Festival 2:32
9 IV Interlude. Adagio - 2:18
10 V Barrel-organ Waltz. Allegretto 2:04
11 VI Galop. Allegro 1:56
12 VII Introducton. Andantino 6:23
13 VIII Romance. Allegro moderato - 6:33
  Yuri Torchinsky violin  
14 IX Intermezzo. Andante - Moderato - Tempo I 5:07
15 X Nocturne. Moderato 3:42
  Peter Dixon cello  
16 XI Scene. Moderato 2:51
17 XII Finale. Allegro non troppo - 3:16
   
premiere recording
 

'Volochayev Days', Op. 48

9:16  
  Incidental music to the film by the Vasiliev brothers  
18 I Overture. Allegretto 2:05
19 II The Japanese Attack. Allegretto 3:34
20 III [Fragment] Allegro - Maestoso - Meno mosso 3:36
The latest release in Chandos’ successful Film Music series is the second volume dedicated to the film scores of Dmitri Shostakovich.

The BBC Philharmonic has consistently maintained the highest standards throughout this series.

Shostakovich’s film scores are characteristic of his music at its best: full of good tunes, atmosphere, invention, colour and energy.

This unique programme contains the premiere recording of the music from Volochayev Days.


The Golden Mountains (1931) was Shostakovich’s third film score. The film is set in 1914 but inspired by the 1905 strike in St Petersburg’s Putilov ironworks, which sparked a wave of similar uprisings throughout the country and quickly came to be seen as a decisive moment in the history of the revolution. Shostakovich was developing a more symphonic approach to film scoring and was able to include some extended cues in the film. The suite he compiled from the music almost immediately afterwards was his first film score suite.

Following the Pravda denunciations of Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk and The Limpid Stream in 1936, Shostakovich’s income fell by around two-thirds. He had little option but to accept cinema work, regardless of the films’ quality. Nevertheless he still managed to produce some worthwhile music for these projects. Volochayev Days (1937) is set in 1918 at a time when Russo-Japanese relations had long been strained. In the film, a Japanese commander, claiming to be visiting Russia to collect botanical specimens, attacks and sets fire to a village.

The Gadfly was one of an increasing number of populist Soviet films. Shostakovich wrote a good deal of music for it, though the process of editing meant that much of it was abbreviated in the film. The suite compiled by Lev Atovmian quickly became a hit in Russia, but it was only when it was used as theme music for the British television series Reilly, Ace of Spies, that it became widely known in the West. The Gadfly is full of colourful and effective music that works both in the film and (with Atovmian’s help) the concert hall.


'Shostakovich hated writing for films. Yet the melodic invention , orchestration and atmospheric variety of these scores completely belies their money-earning inspiration' Vivid recording, compelling performances.'
Classic FM Magazine

'The Chandos issue will appeal to film music buffs and Shostakovich completists, but it deserves to reach a wider audience given the flair and dynamism of the music-making and the high quotient of tunes. As I observed last time round, Sinaisky is always right inside the idiom, just the man for the job.'
Gramophone

The Chandos issue will appeal to film music buffs and Shostakovich completists, but it deserves to reach a wider audience given the flair and dynamism of the music-making and the high quotient of tunes. As I observed last time round, Sinaisky is always right inside the idiom, just the man for the job.
Gramophone

Shostakovich hated writing for films. Yet the melodic invention , orchestration and atmospheric variety of these scores completely belies their money-earning inspiration' Vivid recording, compelling performances.
Classic FM Magazine

As ever with this partnership, the BBC Philharmonic players pull out all the stops for their principal guest conductor Vassily Sinaisky, and the music-making is lively and distinctive.
The Telegraph

'As ever with this partnership, the BBC Philharmonic players pull out all the stops for their principal guest conductor Vassily Sinaisky, and the music-making is lively and distinctive.'
The Telegraph

'I haven't heard all recordings of The Gadfly suite, but I feel comfortable in saying that Sinaisky's probably is at the front of the pack, given the refined yet lively playing of the BBC Philharmonic, and Chandos' almost histrionic engineering.'
Fanfare (USA)




*****
Elizabeth Wilson in her excellent ‘Shostakovich A life Remembered’ lists fourteen films for which Shostakovich wrote the music, but makes no reference to The Gadfly. The booklet for this recording reveals that whilst the film score was by Shostakovich, the suite was put together by Levon Atovmyan. Reassuringly, E.W. tells us that Atovmyan was “Shostakovich’s lifelong friend and ally” and that “S… trusted A… at every level and allowed him to make arrangements of his film and theatre music”. Shostakovich was very protective of all he wrote: he once told Klemperer, who tried to persuade him to reduce the number of flutes required for his 4th Symphony, that “what is written with the pen cannot be scratched out with an axe”. However, he did not interfere with conductors when interpreting his scores, so perhaps we might view Atovmyan’s work in that light. Be that as it may, what we have on this disc is an example of cinematic music of the very first rank. Immediately accessible with allusions to Britten, Prokofiev, and Tchaikovsky and underpinned by the distinctive fingerprint of Shostakovich, this is music so evocative that, aided only by a slim knowledge of the story, one is transported deep into the turmoil of events in 1840’s Italy. Though accessible it is never cheap. The wonder is that the suite has so seldom been heard in the concert hall. At about 40 mins in length, it is near the average for a romantic symphony, but in fifty years of concert going, and looking at options at different venues I am unable to recall ever seeing The Gadfly being programmed. Astonishing and regrettable. In the Chandos recording of The Gadfly, the playing of the BBC Philharmonic is absolutely immaculate, with every voice in the orchestra beautifully balanced. Vassily Sinaisky articulates every mood to perfection and an authentic atmosphere is captured. How can one say this not having seen the film or read the book? Music usually speaks for itself and it certainly does so here. Highly recommended.
D HARRIES

*****
I heard the Gadfly suite recently at a concert but the other works were new to me. If you only know the Shostakovich of the symphonies then this is a great introduction to his somewhat lighter works. Great tunes and stunning orchestration. The BBC Phil play superbly and the recording will give your speakers a good work out!
S Southwell