Background Image Background Image Background Image
background image

CHAN 3032
StarStarStarStarStar Rating
Log in to be the first to review this disc
Background Image Background Image Background Image
background image
Opera In English Logo
CHAN 3032
Great Operatic Arias, Vol. 4 - Alastair Miles

Great Operatic Arias, Vol. 4 - Alastair Miles

The Classical Shop
release date: March 2000

Originally recorded in 1999

Artists:

Philharmonia Orchestra


David Parry


Alastair Miles

bass

Venue:

The Colosseum, Watford



Producer:

Brian Couzens



Engineer:

Ralph Couzens


Richard Smoker

(Assistant)

Record Label
Opera In English

Genre:

Vocal & Song


Opera in English

Total Time - 76:00
background image
SELECT YOUR MUSIC FORMAT FROM THE OPTIONS BELOW*
mp3question marklosslessoff  
*when you purchase a lossless format, we include the MP3 free of charge
Please Note: On Mp3 format an unavoidable click may be heard on segue track breaks, to avoid this issue please select lossless
 
DOWNLOADS
Buttonbooklet

Great Operatic Arias, Vol. 4 - Alastair Miles

 

GIUSEPPE VERDI

Select Complete Single Disc for
1 

Chorus of Hebrew Slaves & Zaccaria's Prophecy from Nabucco (Nebuchadnezzar)

8:51
  'Speed your journey'  
  (Va, pensiero) -  
  'Why lament ye?'  
  (Oh chi piane?0  
  with Geoffrey Mitchell Choir  
 

GIOACHINO ROSSINI

2 

Polidoro's Cavatina from Zelmira

3:31
  'Ah! One whole day has passed'  
  ('Aha! già trascorse il di)  
3 

Mahomet II's Aria from Mahomet

6:37
  'Brave soldiers, arise and join me'  
  (Sorgete e in si bel giorno)  
  with Geoffrey Mitchell Choir  
4 

Prayer: Quartet from Moses in Egypt

3:32
  'Look down on us from Heaven'  
  (Dal tuo stellato soglio)  
  with Sandra Ford soprano  
  Antonia Sotgiu mezzo-soprano  
  Barry Banks tenor  
  Geoffrey Mitchell Choir  
 

GIUSEPPE VERDI

5 

Scena and Walter and Wurm's Duet from Luisa Miller

7:43
  'He will not listen'  
  (Egli delira) -  
  'It was for his sake and his alone'  
  (L'alto retaggio non ho bramato)  
  with Clive Bayley bass  
6 

Scena, Pagano's Aria and Chorus from The Lombards at the First Crusade

10:17
  'Lord, grant us peace, we beg Thee'  
  (A te nell'ora infausta) -  
  'Wretched Woman! Did you imagine'  
  (Sciaguraa! hai tu creduto) -  
  'Only cowards would be frightened'  
  (Ni un periglio il nostro seno)  
  with Clive Bayley bass  
  Geoffrey Mitchell Choir  
 

CARLOS GOMES

7 

The Duke of Arcos's Recitative and Aria from Salvator Rosa

6:11
  'And must I really sign?'  
  (E il foglio io segnerò?) -  
  'The pleasures of marriage'  
  (Di sposo . . . di padre . . .)  
 

VINCENZO BELLINI

8 

Chorus of Druids and Oroveso's Aria from Norma

2:38
  'Grant her the gift of prophecy'  
  (Dell'aura tua profetica) -  
  'Here where the ancient oak tree grows'  
  (Si: parlerà terribile)  
  with Geoffrey Mitchell Choir  
 

GIOACHINO ROSSINI

9 

Invocation and Quintet from Moses in Egypt

6:50
  'Supreme judge and ruler'  
  (Eterno! Immenso!) -  
  'O Thou who by Thy mercy'  
  (Celeste man placata!)  
  with Sandra Ford soprano  
  Barry Banks tenor  
  Dominic Natoli tenor  
  Clive Bayley bass  
  Geoffrey Mitchell Choir  
 

GIUSEPPE VERDI

10 

Procida's Recitative and Aria from The Sicilian Vespers

7:14
  'My homeland, beloved homeland'  
  (O patria, o cara patria) -  
  'Oh, my Palermo'  
  (O tu Palermo)  
 

VINCENZO BELLINI

11 

Giorgio and Riccardo's Duet from The Puritans

12:36
  'Save his life, though he's your rival'  
  (Il rival salvar tu dèi)  
  with Garry Magee baritone  
Internationally acclaimed bass Alastair Miles performs a sensational selection of operatic arias, recorded in English for the first time.

This disc offers an interesting and varied collection of works including ‘The Chorus of the Hebrew Slaves’ from Verdi’s Nabucco, so popular among Italians that it was once a candidate for the national anthem.

As with all opera in English recordings this disc is available at mid-price.

This recording is part of Chandos’ ground-breaking Opera in English series made in association with the Peter Moores Foundation. This series forms the most comprehensive collection of Opera in English recordings ever undertaken by a record company and is a major addition to the catalogue.

It is true and sad to say that the bass does not have the popular appeal of the higher male voices. Where the tenor is associated with youth and love, and the baritone with love, nobility or at least with bonhomie, bass gets all the heavy parts. Whether in Italian, German, French, Russian or English opera, if the basses aren’t villains they tend to be fathers, gods, kings or priests: figures of authority with whom an audience is unlikely to identify.

And yet, as this recital by Alastair Miles demonstrates, arias and duets written for the bass voice can be as glorious as any of the more obvious showstoppers. All the pieces are from the nineteenth-century Italian repertoire, featuring the kind of voice that the Italians call basso cantate (‘singing bass’), of which the most notable recent exponents have been Ezio Pinza between the two wars and, in our own day, Ruggiero Raimondi and Samuel Ramey.


Internationally acclaimed bass Alastair Miles performs a sensational selection of operatic arias, recorded in English for the first time.

This disc offers an interesting and varied collection of works including ‘The Chorus of the Hebrew Slaves’ from Verdi’s Nabucco, so popular among Italians that it was once a candidate for the national anthem.

As with all opera in English recordings this disc is available at mid-price.

This recording is part of Chandos’ ground-breaking Opera in English series made in association with the Peter Moores Foundation. This series forms the most comprehensive collection of Opera in English recordings ever undertaken by a record company and is a major addition to the catalogue.



It is true and sad to say that the bass does not have the popular appeal of the higher male voices. Where the tenor is associated with youth and love, and the baritone with love, nobility or at least with bonhomie, bass gets all the heavy parts. Whether in Italian, German, French, Russian or English opera, if the basses aren’t villains they tend to be fathers, gods, kings or priests: figures of authority with whom an audience is unlikely to identify.

And yet, as this recital by Alastair Miles demonstrates, arias and duets written for the bass voice can be as glorious as any of the more obvious showstoppers. All the pieces are from the nineteenth-century Italian repertoire, featuring the kind of voice that the Italians call basso cantate (‘singing bass’), of which the most notable recent exponents have been Ezio Pinza between the two wars and, in our own day, Ruggiero Raimondi and Samuel Ramey.


Internationally acclaimed bass Alastair Miles performs a sensational selection of operatic arias, recorded in English for the first time.

This disc offers an interesting and varied collection of works including ‘The Chorus of the Hebrew Slaves’ from Verdi’s Nabucco, so popular among Italians that it was once a candidate for the national anthem.

As with all opera in English recordings this disc is available at mid-price.

This recording is part of Chandos’ ground-breaking Opera in English series made in association with the Peter Moores Foundation. This series forms the most comprehensive collection of Opera in English recordings ever undertaken by a record company and is a major addition to the catalogue.

It is true and sad to say that the bass does not have the popular appeal of the higher male voices. Where the tenor is associated with youth and love, and the baritone with love, nobility or at least with bonhomie, bass gets all the heavy parts. Whether in Italian, German, French, Russian or English opera, if the basses aren’t villains they tend to be fathers, gods, kings or priests: figures of authority with whom an audience is unlikely to identify.

And yet, as this recital by Alastair Miles demonstrates, arias and duets written for the bass voice can be as glorious as any of the more obvious showstoppers. All the pieces are from the nineteenth-century Italian repertoire, featuring the kind of voice that the Italians call basso cantate (‘singing bass’), of which the most notable recent exponents have been Ezio Pinza between the two wars and, in our own day, Ruggiero Raimondi and Samuel Ramey.



Internationally acclaimed bass Alastair Miles performs a sensational selection of operatic arias, recorded in English for the first time.

This disc offers an interesting and varied collection of works including ‘The Chorus of the Hebrew Slaves’ from Verdi’s Nabucco, so popular among Italians that it was once a candidate for the national anthem.

As with all opera in English recordings this disc is available at mid-price.

This recording is part of Chandos’ ground-breaking Opera in English series made in association with the Peter Moores Foundation. This series forms the most comprehensive collection of Opera in English recordings ever undertaken by a record company and is a major addition to the catalogue.



It is true and sad to say that the bass does not have the popular appeal of the higher male voices. Where the tenor is associated with youth and love, and the baritone with love, nobility or at least with bonhomie, bass gets all the heavy parts. Whether in Italian, German, French, Russian or English opera, if the basses aren’t villains they tend to be fathers, gods, kings or priests: figures of authority with whom an audience is unlikely to identify.

And yet, as this recital by Alastair Miles demonstrates, arias and duets written for the bass voice can be as glorious as any of the more obvious showstoppers. All the pieces are from the nineteenth-century Italian repertoire, featuring the kind of voice that the Italians call basso cantate (‘singing bass’), of which the most notable recent exponents have been Ezio Pinza between the two wars and, in our own day, Ruggiero Raimondi and Samuel Ramey.



‘This is the best that I’ve heard yet in Chandos’ series of Opera in English… Alastair Miles is superb…’
Fanfare on CHAN 3008 (La bohème)

‘Alastair Miles’s Méphistophélès seems a mild-mannered type with reserves of authority and a magnificent voice. Vocally he is very impressive indeed, the fine texture of his voice showing up to great advantage, his production admirably firm and even, his style unfailingly musical.’
Gramophone on CHAN 3014(3) (Faust)



No User Reviews Found.