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CHAN 6595M
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CHAN 6595
(multiple CD Set)

Mahler: Symphony No.2

The Classical Shop
release date: February 1993

Originally recorded in 1992

Artists:

Oslo Philharmonic Orchestra


Mariss Jansons


Julia Hamari

contralto

Felicity Lott

soprano

Lativan State Academic Choir


Oslo Philharmonic Chorus



Venue:

Oslo Philharmonic Hall



Producer:

James Burnett



Engineer:

Charles Almas



Record Label
Collect

Genre:

Orchestral & Concertos


Choir

Total Time - 83:30
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GUSTAV MAHLER

   
 

Symphony No. 2 in C minor 'Resurrection'

1:23.37  
1 I Allegro maestoso 22:27
2 II Andante moderato 09:53
3 III In ruhig fliessender bewegung 10:43
4 IV Urlicht. Sehr feierlich, aber schlicht 05:39
5 V Im tempo des scherzos 34:48
   
 Felicity Lott soprano
 Julia Hamari contralto
 Mariss Jansons
  10 - 15 November 1989  
Mahler: Symphony No. 2 (Resurrection) – Oslo PO, Jansons

‘The crisp attack at the start of the opening funeral march sets the pattern for an exceptionally refined and alert reading of the Resurrection Symphony from Jansons and his Oslo Orchestra. During the first four movements, this may seem a lightweight reading, but the extra resilience of rhythm brings out the dance element in Mahler’s Knaben Wunderhorn inspirations rather than ruggedness or rusticity, while at the finale the whole performance erupts in an overwhelming outburst for the vision of Resurrection. That transformation is intensified by the breathtakingly rapt and intense account of the song “Urlicht” which precedes it. In the finale, power goes with precision and meticulous observance of markings, when even Mahler’s surprising diminuendo of the final choral cadence is observed. With the Oslo Choir joined by singers from Jansons’s native Latvia, the choral singing is heartfelt, to crown a version which finds a special place even among the many distinguished readings on a long list.’

The Penguin Guide to Recorded Classical Music




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