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CHAN 9770
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CHAN 9770

Tcherepnin: Complete Music for Cello & Piano

The Classical Shop
release date: November 1999

Recorded in 24 Bit / 44.1Khz

Originally recorded in 1999

Artists:

Alexander Ivashkin

cello

Geoffrey Tozer

piano

Venue:

Great Hall, Arts Centre, Christchurch, New Zealand



Producer:

Wayne Laird



Engineer:

Wayne Laird



Record Label
Chandos

Genre:

Chamber


Russian

Total Time - 65:32
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Please Note: On Mp3 format an unavoidable click may be heard on segue track breaks, to avoid this issue please select lossless or better
 
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Buttonbooklet
 

ALEXANDER TCHEREPNIN

(1899-1977)
Select Complete Single Disc for
   
  premiere recordings  
   
 

Cello Sonata No. 1, Op. 29

11:06  
1 I Allegro 3:52
2 II Cadenza - Très rythmé et énergique - Cadenza 3:36
3 III Allegretto - Allegro 3:33
   
 

Cello Sonata No. 2, Op. 30 No. 1

9:43  
4 I Moderato - Allegro molto - Moderato tranquillo 4:09
5 II Lento 2:53
6 III Vivace 2:34
   
 

Cello Sonata No. 3, Op. 30 No. 2

10:45  
7 I Allegro moderato 5:24
8 II Andantino 3:37
9 III Presto 1:34
   
 

The Well-Tempered Cello, Op. 38

22:17  
  (Twelve Preludes on a Scale of Nine Intervals)  
10 I Moderato 1:26
11 II Tempo risoluto 2:16
12 III Animato 0:56
13 IV Moderato 1:59
14 V Mesto 2:13
15 VI Allegro 1:53
16 VII Allegretto 1:26
17 VIII Lento 1:52
18 IX Allegretto 2:25
19 X Allegro 0:48
20 XI Moderato tranquillo 2:15
21 XII Comodo 1:44
   
 

Songs and Dances, Op. 84

11:33  
22 I Georgian Song 3:29
23 II Tartar Dance 1:14
24 III Russian Song 3:53
25 IV Kazakh Dance 2:52
   
26 

Ode

1:39
Alexander Ivashkin and Geoffrey Tozer perform the premiere recording of five of Tcherepnin’s neglected works for cello and piano.

There is currently only one other recording of Tcherepnin’s Ode available – all the other works included on this disc are premiere recordings.

This disc features Tcherepnin’s complete original music for cello and piano. Later in his life he did arrange other works for this combination, but they cannot be classed as original compositions.

Following the successful release of Nikolai Tcherepnin’s ballet Narcisse et Echo (CHAN 9670), it is interesting to compare it with the music of his son Alexander featured on this disc. It is also fitting that this disc is being release now, as 1999 is the centenary of Alexander Tcherepnin’s birth.



Alexander Tcherepnin can be described as one of the most prominent figures among those Russian composers who had to leave their homeland shortly after the Revolution. He was an extraordinarily gifted boy, privileged to be included at an early age in an exclusive musical circle. Here is an excerpt from his Short Autobiography:

‘Music in our home was a religion. I was the only child, and as a result I was admitted to all musical reunions (thus remembering Rimsky, Liadov, Cui, Glazunov, Stravinsky, Prokofiev, Diaghilev, Benois, Fokine, Pavlova, Chaliapin, etc.) and rehearsals at home and at the concert halls[…]’

In 1918 the Tcherepnins left Petrograd (St Petersburg) and settled in Georgia. It was here that the two pivotal elements of his musical language began to tale shape; the major/minor nine-note ‘scale of Tcherepnin (e.g. C,D flat, E,F,G,A flat, A B) and the technique of ‘interpoint’ as opposed to counterpoint.

Alexander Ivashkin writes in his introduction to the booklet notes:

‘It is frankly surprising that the sonatas, preludes and other cello compositions of Alexander Tcherepnin are not more frequently performed and recorded. I hope you will enjoy his cello music just as I do. It is certainly a discovery for cellists. I am happy that we can celebrate the centennial year of Alexander Tcherepnin’s birth by listening to his music and finding in it so many innovative and fresh ideas.



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*****
A Van Der Hoven

*****
J Rust