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CHAN 9801
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CHAN 9801
Works for Piano and Orchestra, Vol.1

Liszt: Works for Piano & Orchestra, Vol. 1

The Classical Shop
release date: March 2000

Recorded in 24 Bit / 44.1Khz

Originally recorded in 1999

Artists:

Residentie Orchestra The Hague


George Pehlivanian


Louis Lortie

piano

Venue:

Dr Anton Philipszaal, The Hague, The Netherlands



Producer:

Brian Couzens



Engineer:

Jonathan Cooper


Peter Newble

(Asistant)

Record Label
Chandos

Genre:

Piano


Orchestral & Concertos

Total Time - 65:22
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Works for Piano and Orchestra, Vol.1

 

FRANZ LISZT

Select Complete Single Disc for
   
 

Wandererfantasie, S366

21:02  
  (Schubert, D760, orch. Liszt)  
1 I Allegro con fuoco, ma non troppo - 6:11
2 II Adagio - 6:42
3 III Presto 4:32
4 IV Allegro 3:37
   
5 

Fantasia on a theme from Beethoven's 'Ruins of Athens', S122

10:45
   
6 

Polonaise brillante, S367

9:29
  (Weber, Op. 72, orch. Liszt)  
 

Grand fantaisie symphonique on themes from Berlioz's 'Lélio', S120

24:06  
7 I Lento - 12:19
8 II Allegro vivace 7:57
9 III Andantino, senza interruzione - Vivace animoto 3:50
Pianist Louis Lortie performs works composed or orchestrated by Franz Liszt – one of the greatest pianists of all time.

This disc features the very rare Grand fantasie symphonique on these from Berlioz’s Léilo which is rarely performed either in its original form or in Liszt’s transcription.

Lortie and Pehlivanian have performed Liszt together many times in concert – this is the first time their partnership has been heard on disc.


Beethoven wrote Ruins of Athens as incidental music for a play by Kotzebue whose text he admired. It is by no means a great work but served patriotic purposes. Beethoven’s music for theatre was uneven, and the incidental music to The Ruins of Athens consists of an overture and a medley of choruses and marches with occasional arias, recitatives and melodramas. Liszt however transforms the works into a brilliant piece. He introduces strings, horns, triangle and cymbals to great effect. ‘Grande Fantasie Symphonique on Themes from Berlioz’s Léilo’ is an extremely unusual work and is rarely performed. Its original form was a monodrama to be played straight after Symphonie fantastique – invisibly: the chorus, orchestra and soloists are behind a curtain, in front of which Léilo speaks. Liszt’s transcription presents the player with great technical difficulties. Weber’s Pollacca brillante and Invitiation to the Dance are his most brilliant piano pieces. Lizst changed the title from the Italian ‘Polacca’ to the French Polonaise, and transcribed the piece at about the same time as he transcribed Schubert’s Wandererfantasie. Liszt was particularly interested in Schubert’s WandererFantasie which was unique in Schubert’s output. It was not a sonata or a set of variations although it contains elements of both. Liszt, like Wagner, was experimenting with writing music of some length without having to break it up into smaller sections, which meant developing a way of unifying themes that could be sung or played continuously. The orchestral quality of Der Wanderer was certain to attract Liszt’s attention, and he has divided the material between the orchestra and the piano with characteristic insight.

Pianist Louis Lortie performs works composed or orchestrated by Franz Liszt – one of the greatest pianists of all time.

This disc features the very rare Grand fantasie symphonique on these from Berlioz’s Léilo which is rarely performed either in its original form or in Liszt’s transcription.

Lortie and Pehlivanian have performed Liszt together many times in concert – this is the first time their partnership has been heard on disc.


Beethoven wrote Ruins of Athens as incidental music for a play by Kotzebue whose text he admired. It is by no means a great work but served patriotic purposes. Beethoven’s music for theatre was uneven, and the incidental music to The Ruins of Athens consists of an overture and a medley of choruses and marches with occasional arias, recitatives and melodramas. Liszt however transforms the works into a brilliant piece. He introduces strings, horns, triangle and cymbals to great effect. ‘Grande Fantasie Symphonique on Themes from Berlioz’s Léilo’ is an extremely unusual work and is rarely performed. Its original form was a monodrama to be played straight after Symphonie fantastique – invisibly: the chorus, orchestra and soloists are behind a curtain, in front of which Léilo speaks. Liszt’s transcription presents the player with great technical difficulties. Weber’s Pollacca brillante and Invitiation to the Dance are his most brilliant piano pieces. Lizst changed the title from the Italian ‘Polacca’ to the French Polonaise, and transcribed the piece at about the same time as he transcribed Schubert’s Wandererfantasie. Liszt was particularly interested in Schubert’s WandererFantasie which was unique in Schubert’s output. It was not a sonata or a set of variations although it contains elements of both. Liszt, like Wagner, was experimenting with writing music of some length without having to break it up into smaller sections, which meant developing a way of unifying themes that could be sung or played continuously. The orchestral quality of Der Wanderer was certain to attract Liszt’s attention, and he has divided the material between the orchestra and the piano with characteristic insight.

Pianist Louis Lortie performs works composed or orchestrated by Franz Liszt – one of the greatest pianists of all time.

This disc features the very rare Grand fantasie symphonique on these from Berlioz’s Léilo which is rarely performed either in its original form or in Liszt’s transcription.

Lortie and Pehlivanian have performed Liszt together many times in concert – this is the first time their partnership has been heard on disc.



Beethoven wrote Ruins of Athens as incidental music for a play by Kotzebue whose text he admired. It is by no means a great work but served patriotic purposes. Beethoven’s music for theatre was uneven, and the incidental music to The Ruins of Athens consists of an overture and a medley of choruses and marches with occasional arias, recitatives and melodramas. Liszt however transforms the works into a brilliant piece. He introduces strings, horns, triangle and cymbals to great effect. ‘Grande Fantasie Symphonique on Themes from Berlioz’s Léilo’ is an extremely unusual work and is rarely performed. Its original form was a monodrama to be played straight after Symphonie fantastique – invisibly: the chorus, orchestra and soloists are behind a curtain, in front of which Léilo speaks. Liszt’s transcription presents the player with great technical difficulties. Weber’s Pollacca brillante and Invitiation to the Dance are his most brilliant piano pieces. Lizst changed the title from the Italian ‘Polacca’ to the French Polonaise, and transcribed the piece at about the same time as he transcribed Schubert’s Wandererfantasie. Liszt was particularly interested in Schubert’s WandererFantasie which was unique in Schubert’s output. It was not a sonata or a set of variations although it contains elements of both. Liszt, like Wagner, was experimenting with writing music of some length without having to break it up into smaller sections, which meant developing a way of unifying themes that could be sung or played continuously. The orchestral quality of Der Wanderer was certain to attract Liszt’s attention, and he has divided the material between the orchestra and the piano with characteristic insight.

Pianist Louis Lortie performs works composed or orchestrated by Franz Liszt – one of the greatest pianists of all time.

This disc features the very rare Grand fantasie symphonique on these from Berlioz’s Léilo which is rarely performed either in its original form or in Liszt’s transcription.

Lortie and Pehlivanian have performed Liszt together many times in concert – this is the first time their partnership has been heard on disc.



Beethoven wrote Ruins of Athens as incidental music for a play by Kotzebue whose text he admired. It is by no means a great work but served patriotic purposes. Beethoven’s music for theatre was uneven, and the incidental music to The Ruins of Athens consists of an overture and a medley of choruses and marches with occasional arias, recitatives and melodramas. Liszt however transforms the works into a brilliant piece. He introduces strings, horns, triangle and cymbals to great effect. ‘Grande Fantasie Symphonique on Themes from Berlioz’s Léilo’ is an extremely unusual work and is rarely performed. Its original form was a monodrama to be played straight after Symphonie fantastique – invisibly: the chorus, orchestra and soloists are behind a curtain, in front of which Léilo speaks. Liszt’s transcription presents the player with great technical difficulties. Weber’s Pollacca brillante and Invitiation to the Dance are his most brilliant piano pieces. Lizst changed the title from the Italian ‘Polacca’ to the French Polonaise, and transcribed the piece at about the same time as he transcribed Schubert’s Wandererfantasie. Liszt was particularly interested in Schubert’s WandererFantasie which was unique in Schubert’s output. It was not a sonata or a set of variations although it contains elements of both. Liszt, like Wagner, was experimenting with writing music of some length without having to break it up into smaller sections, which meant developing a way of unifying themes that could be sung or played continuously. The orchestral quality of Der Wanderer was certain to attract Liszt’s attention, and he has divided the material between the orchestra and the piano with characteristic insight.

‘Lortie’s playing has all the warmth and musicality one could wish for… fine recording.’
BBC Music Magazine on CHAN 9347 (Beethoven)

‘His [Lortie’s] carefully shaded tone, coupled with rhythmic finesse and communicative dynamism are qualities that convey both the poetry and the creative substance of these remarkable works!’
The Daily Telegraph on CHAN 9736 (Beethoven)

‘Lortie is a stunning pianist gifted with a dazzling technique that sounds effortless.’
Fanfare on CHAN 9212 (Beethoven)




*****
B Thissen

*****
K Coenen