Background Image Background Image Background Image
background image

CHAN 9816
Star    2 Ratings
Log in to review this disc
Background Image Background Image Background Image
background image
Chandos Logo
CHAN 9816

Bartok: Divertimento · Janacek: Idyll

The Classical Shop
release date: March 2000

Recorded in 24 Bit / 44.1Khz
album available as a Studio Master
Originally recorded in 1999

Artists:

Iona Brown


Norwegian Chamber Orchestra



Venue:

Eidsvoll Church, Norway



Producer:

Andrew Keener



Engineer:

Tony Faulkner



Record Label
Chandos

Genre:

Orchestral & Concertos




Total Time - 66:59
Background Image Background Image Background Image
background image
Customers who bought this album, also bought...
CHAN%209434.JPEG
Ginastera/ Villa-Lobos/Evangelista: Chamber Muic
CHAN%20241-26.jpeg
Music from Estonia
CHAN%209752.jpeg
Beach: Piano Quintet
CHAN%209566.JPEG
Arutiunian: Concerto · Sinfonietta · Concertino
CHAN%209310.JPEG
Janacek: Glagolitic Mass · Kodaly: Psalmus hungaricus

Scroll Scroll

background image
SELECT YOUR MUSIC FORMAT FROM THE OPTIONS BELOW*
onquestion marklosslessquestion markStudio Fileoffquestion mark 
*if you purchase a higher level format, we include the lower formats free of charge
Please Note: On Mp3 format an unavoidable click may be heard on segue track breaks, to avoid this issue please select lossless or better
 
DOWNLOADS
Buttonbooklet
 

BELA BARTOK

Select Complete Single Disc for
 

Divertimento for Strings, Sz 113

24:13  
1 I Allegro non troppo 8:57
2 II Molto adagio 8:21
3 III Allegro assai 6:53
   
 

LEOS JANACEK

 

Idyll for String Orchestra

24:02  
4 I Andante - 3:47
5 II Allegro - Moderato - Tempo I - 3:03
6 III Moderato - Con moto - Tempo I 2:56
7 IV Allegro 3:02
8 V Adagio - Presto - Tempo I - 4:46
9 VI Scherzo & Trio - 3:01
10 VII Moderato 3:22
   
 

Suite for String Orchestra

18:55  
11 I Moderato 3:42
12 II Adagio 3:26
13 III Andante con moto 1:14
14 IV Scherzo & Trio 2:46
15 V Adagio - 3:26
16 VI Andante 4:17
The Norwegian Chamber Orchestra under the expert guidance of Iona Brown brings together three works from two very contrasting composers.

The three previous discs from the Norwegian Chamber Orchestra and Iona Brown have been extremely well received by the musical press.

Iona Brown became Artistic Director of the Norwegian Chamber Orchestra in 1981. It has since become established as one of the foremost chamber orchestras in Europe, appearing regularly at prestigious venues in Europe and the USA. The orchestra is highly respected for its wide variety of repertoire.


Both Bartók and Janácek were steeped in the folk music of their different homelands and from their studies each had absorbed what he wanted into his mature style.

Bartók’s Divertimento for Strings, Sz113 (1939), was written at the height of the composer’s maturity, when he began to simplify a style which was increasingly preoccupied with modernist experiment. It was commissioned of the Basle Chamber Orchestra by Paul Sacher who wanted ‘something simpler’ than the previous piece he had commissioned from Bartók – Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta, Sz106 (1936). MThe resulting three-movement piece conforms to traditional structures, respectively, of sonata form, ternary form and rondo form. There is residue of folk music everywhere, but far more integral is the melodic and harmonic language – Bartók’s sophisticated extension of conventional modality.

Taken together Janácek’s pieces provide some insight into the music the young Janácek had come across. Both works are a homage to Dvorák, the composer he most venerated. Most movements are cast in the formal structures of Baroque dances, as the titles of the movements attest, but they betray the young Janácek’s ignorance of Baroque music. For example, the Sarabande is in quadruple time, and the Allemande is not particularly dance-like. There is little that hints at the mature Janácek, although in 1926 he looked through the Suite and had it published, but the Idyll was thought lost and not published until after his death.




The Norwegian Chamber Orchestra under the expert guidance of Iona Brown brings together three works from two very contrasting composers.

The three previous discs from the Norwegian Chamber Orchestra and Iona Brown have been extremely well received by the musical press.

Iona Brown became Artistic Director of the Norwegian Chamber Orchestra in 1981. It has since become established as one of the foremost chamber orchestras in Europe, appearing regularly at prestigious venues in Europe and the USA. The orchestra is highly respected for its wide variety of repertoire.


Both Bartók and Janácek were steeped in the folk music of their different homelands and from their studies each had absorbed what he wanted into his mature style.

Bartók’s Divertimento for Strings, Sz113 (1939), was written at the height of the composer’s maturity, when he began to simplify a style which was increasingly preoccupied with modernist experiment. It was commissioned of the Basle Chamber Orchestra by Paul Sacher who wanted ‘something simpler’ than the previous piece he had commissioned from Bartók – Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta, Sz106 (1936). MThe resulting three-movement piece conforms to traditional structures, respectively, of sonata form, ternary form and rondo form. There is residue of folk music everywhere, but far more integral is the melodic and harmonic language – Bartók’s sophisticated extension of conventional modality.

Taken together Janácek’s pieces provide some insight into the music the young Janácek had come across. Both works are a homage to Dvorák, the composer he most venerated. Most movements are cast in the formal structures of Baroque dances, as the titles of the movements attest, but they betray the young Janácek’s ignorance of Baroque music. For example, the Sarabande is in quadruple time, and the Allemande is not particularly dance-like. There is little that hints at the mature Janácek, although in 1926 he looked through the Suite and had it published, but the Idyll was thought lost and not published until after his death.



The Norwegian Chamber Orchestra under the expert guidance of Iona Brown brings together three works from two very contrasting composers.

The three previous discs from the Norwegian Chamber Orchestra and Iona Brown have been extremely well received by the musical press.

Iona Brown became Artistic Director of the Norwegian Chamber Orchestra in 1981. It has since become established as one of the foremost chamber orchestras in Europe, appearing regularly at prestigious venues in Europe and the USA. The orchestra is highly respected for its wide variety of repertoire.



Both Bartók and Janácek were steeped in the folk music of their different homelands and from their studies each had absorbed what he wanted into his mature style.

Bartók’s Divertimento for Strings, Sz113 (1939), was written at the height of the composer’s maturity, when he began to simplify a style which was increasingly preoccupied with modernist experiment. It was commissioned of the Basle Chamber Orchestra by Paul Sacher who wanted ‘something simpler’ than the previous piece he had commissioned from Bartók – Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta, Sz106 (1936). MThe resulting three-movement piece conforms to traditional structures, respectively, of sonata form, ternary form and rondo form. There is residue of folk music everywhere, but far more integral is the melodic and harmonic language – Bartók’s sophisticated extension of conventional modality.

Taken together Janácek’s pieces provide some insight into the music the young Janácek had come across. Both works are a homage to Dvorák, the composer he most venerated. Most movements are cast in the formal structures of Baroque dances, as the titles of the movements attest, but they betray the young Janácek’s ignorance of Baroque music. For example, the Sarabande is in quadruple time, and the Allemande is not particularly dance-like. There is little that hints at the mature Janácek, although in 1926 he looked through the Suite and had it published, but the Idyll was thought lost and not published until after his death.




The Norwegian Chamber Orchestra under the expert guidance of Iona Brown brings together three works from two very contrasting composers.

The three previous discs from the Norwegian Chamber Orchestra and Iona Brown have been extremely well received by the musical press.

Iona Brown became Artistic Director of the Norwegian Chamber Orchestra in 1981. It has since become established as one of the foremost chamber orchestras in Europe, appearing regularly at prestigious venues in Europe and the USA. The orchestra is highly respected for its wide variety of repertoire.



Both Bartók and Janácek were steeped in the folk music of their different homelands and from their studies each had absorbed what he wanted into his mature style.

Bartók’s Divertimento for Strings, Sz113 (1939), was written at the height of the composer’s maturity, when he began to simplify a style which was increasingly preoccupied with modernist experiment. It was commissioned of the Basle Chamber Orchestra by Paul Sacher who wanted ‘something simpler’ than the previous piece he had commissioned from Bartók – Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta, Sz106 (1936). MThe resulting three-movement piece conforms to traditional structures, respectively, of sonata form, ternary form and rondo form. There is residue of folk music everywhere, but far more integral is the melodic and harmonic language – Bartók’s sophisticated extension of conventional modality.

Taken together Janácek’s pieces provide some insight into the music the young Janácek had come across. Both works are a homage to Dvorák, the composer he most venerated. Most movements are cast in the formal structures of Baroque dances, as the titles of the movements attest, but they betray the young Janácek’s ignorance of Baroque music. For example, the Sarabande is in quadruple time, and the Allemande is not particularly dance-like. There is little that hints at the mature Janácek, although in 1926 he looked through the Suite and had it published, but the Idyll was thought lost and not published until after his death.



‘This new performance, at once elegant and beautifully phrased, is also very committed: the playing has great feeling and passion… Rhythm’s are taut and springy, and one senses every player giving his or her all.’
Hi-Fi News on CHAN 9708 (Strauss/Tchaikovsky)

‘The performance by Iona Brown and her fine Norwegian Chamber Orchestra musicians… is rendered with skill and in fine style… Brown elicits playing of supreme warmth…’
Fanfare on CHAN 9708 (Strauss/Tchaikovsky)




*****
R Poyser

*****
F Cayley