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CO 6022
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CO 6022

Eton Choirbook, Volume III: The Pillars of Eternity

The Classical Shop
release date: November 2007

Originally recorded in 2007

Artists:

Harry Christophers


The Sixteen



Venue:

St Bartholemews Church, Orford, Suffolk



Producer:

Mark Brown



Engineer:

Anthony Howell



Record Label
Coro Records

Genre:

Choir




Total Time - 60:18
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RICHARD DAVY

(c. 1465-1507)
1 

O Domine caeli terraeque creator

15:13
   
 

WILLIAM CORNYSHE

(d. 1523)
2 

Ave Maria, Mater Dei

3:43
   
 

RICHARD DAVY

3 

Ah, mine heart, remember thee well

4:52
   
 

WALTER LAMBE

(c. 1450/51-d. after Michaelmas 1499)
4 

Stella caeli

6:43
   
 

RICHARD DAVY

5 

Ah, blessed Jesu, how fortuned this?

9:41
   
 

ROBERT WYLKYNSON

(c. 1450-1515 or later)
6 

Jesus autem transiens/Credo in Deum

5:33
7 

Salve Regina

14:33


Miraculously, the Eton Choirbook survived Henry VIII’s ransacking of the monasteries. Thanks to its survival, the sacred music of the English fifteenth-century is still with us, conjuring up the atmosphere and spirit of the glorious Cathedrals for which it was written. It also gives a tantalising glimpse of a wealth of choral music which was lost.

“It is difficult to believe that any 15th or 16th century choir could have sung this music with the refined blend, the rich tone, or the shapeliness shown by The Sixteen, under the direction of Harry Christophers.”

The Times



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