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HH 0839
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HH 0839
BRAHMS, J.: German Requiem (Toscanini)

BRAHMS: German Requiem (Toscanini)

The Classical Shop
release date: February 2011

Originally recorded in 2000

Artists:

NBC Symphony Orchestra


Toscanini, Arturo


Arturo Toscanini

Conductor

Record Label
Naxos

Genre:




Total Time - 71:08
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BRAHMS, J.: German Requiem (Toscanini)

     
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JOHANNES BRAHMS

 

Ein deutsches Requiem (A German Requiem), Op. 45 (Sung in English)

 
1 Blessed Are They 9:24
     
 

BIBLE

2 Behold, All Flesh Is As The Grass 16:44
     
 

JOHANNES BRAHMS

3 Lord, Make Me To Know 10:51
     
4 How Lovely Is Thy Dwelling Place 5:35
     
5 Ye Now Are Sorrowful 6:38
     
 

BIBLE

6 Here On Earth We Have No Continuing Place 11:47
     
7 Blessed Are The Dead 10:09
     
 Arturo Toscanini Conductor
 Toscanini, Arturo
No Notes Found.
"In January 1943, at the height of the Second World War, Toscanini conducted his performance of the Brahms Requiem in New York, understandably choosing an English text rather than German. As one would expect, it is high-powered, starting with a refreshing, urgent account of the opening Beatitude setting, Blessed are they. After that the next movement, Behold, all flesh is as the grass, is very broad indeed, prevented from sounding sluggish only by Toscanini’s high-voltage intensity, which equally sustains the other movements. Herbert Janssen as the baritone soloist, dramatic and clean-cut, provides Lieder-like detail. Viviane della Chiesa is the fresh, creamy-toned soprano in the fourth movement, and the Westminster Choir adds to the drama, even though backwardly balanced. Limited mono sound, less harsh than may commercial NBC recordings of the period."  **
 
Penguin Guide - January 2009
 



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