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LK 6142
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LK 6142
Cello Recital: Lipkind, Gavriel - MOSZKOWSKI, M. / WIENIAWSKI, H. / ALBENIZ, I. / DINICU, G. / SCRIABIN, A. / PROKOFIEV, S. (Miniatures and Folklore)

Cello Recital: Lipkind, Gavriel - MOSZKOWSKI, M. / WIENIAWSKI, H. / ALBENIZ, I. / DINICU, G. / SCRIABIN, A. / PROKOFIEV, S. (Miniatures and Folklore)

The Classical Shop
release date: November 2011

Recorded in 24 Bit / 88.2Khz
album available as a Studio File

Artists:

Gavriel Lipkind

Soloist

Record Label
Gavriel Lipkind

Genre:

Chamber


Classical

Total Time - 76:52
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Cello Recital: Lipkind, Gavriel - MOSZKOWSKI, M. / WIENIAWSKI, H. / ALBENIZ, I. / DINICU, G. / SCRIABIN, A. / PROKOFIEV, S. (Miniatures and Folklore)

     
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MORITZ MOSZKOWSKI

1 

Guitarre, Op. 45, No. 2 (arr. G. Lipkind)

4:31
     
 

HENRYK WIENIAWSKI

2 

Scherzo-tarantelle, Op. 16 (arr. G. Lipkind)

5:17
     
 

ISAAC ALBENIZ

3 

Espana, Op. 165: II. Tango (arr. F. Kreisler and G. Lipkind)

3:13
     
 

JASCHA HEIFETZ

4 

Hora staccato (arr. G. Lipkind)

2:15
     
 

DOMENICO GABRIELLI

5 

Ricercare No. 5 (arr. G. Lipkind)

1:54
     
 

ALEXANDER TCHEREPNIN

6 

Songs and Dances, Op. 84: No. 2. Tartar Dance (arr. G. Lipkind)

1:21
     
 

SERGEY PROKOFIEV

7 

Music for Children, Op. 65: No. 6. Valse (Waltz) (arr. U. Wiesel)

2:00
     
 

ALEXANDER KONSTANTINOVICH GLAZUNOV

8 

5 Romansi (5 Romances), Op. 4 (arr. G. Lipkind)

2:38
     
 

PAUL BEN-HAIM

9 

Music for Cello

2:30
     
 

ALEXANDER SCRIABIN

10 

Romans (Romance) (arr. G. Lipkind)

3:05
     
 

JOACHIM STUTSCHEWSKY

11 

Oriental Dance (arr. G. Lipkind)

4:42
     
 

SULKHAN TSINTSADZE

12 

5 Pieces: No. 2. Chonguri (arr. G. Lipkind)

2:01
     
 

FELIX MENDELSSOHN

13 

Lieder ohne Worte (Songs without Words), Book 8, Op. 102 (arr. G. Lipkind)

4:33
     
 

DAVID POPPER

14 

Elfentanz, Op. 39

2:31
     
 

GABRIEL FAURE

15 

Allegretto moderato

1:22
     
 

PYOTR IL'YICH TCHAIKOVSKY

16 

18 Morceaux, Op. 72: No. 2. Berceuse (arr. G. Lipkind)

4:16
     
 

JEAN-LOUIS DUPORT

17 

Etude No. 7 (arr. G. Lipkind)

1:46
     
 

JACQUES IBERT

18 

Le petit ane blanc (arr. P. von Wienhardt)

2:37
     
 

GASPAR CASSADO

19 

Suite for Cello Solo: III. Intermezzo e danza finale (arr. G. Lipkind)

7:06
     
 

ERNEST BLOCH

20 

From Jewish Life

5:05
     
 

ALFREDO PIATTI

21 

12 Caprices, Op. 25

2:34
     
 

JOHANNES BRAHMS

22 

21 Hungarian Dances, WoO 1: No. 1 in G minor (arr. P. von Wienhardt and G. Lipkind)

3:50
     
 

FRITZ KREISLER

23 

Tambourin chinois, Op. 3 (arr. P. von Wienhardt and G. Lipkind)

5:45
     
 Gavriel Lipkind Soloist


quoting  PROFFESSOR LAURANCE LESSER

[...] Rather than go through the pieces one-by-one, let me tell you why I think this recording is such an important endeavor.

I grew up in a musical family in Los Angeles, the grandchild of eastern European Jewish immigrants. In my mother’s youth (she was a conservatory- trained pianist), one went to hear all the visiting artists and in-between we collected their 78 rpm recordings. Classical music was everywhere. Hollywood and the Holocaust had combined to give my community countless musical riches and the paradise climate had attracted major artists to the area as well. The names of Igor Stravinsky, Arnold Schoenberg, Arthur Rubinstein, Jascha Heifetz, Gregor Piatigorsky, Thomas Mann only begin the list.
The first solo recital concerts I remember hearing always had a “heavy” first half and after intermission a collection of shorter pieces. These latter were the ones I knew from my mother’s 78’s and we always looked forward to that part of the program because it was there that the artist truly revealed himself.

But at the same time a quiet revolution was taking place in programming. Great artists like Schnabel attracted audiences for all Beethoven sonata pro- grams. “Serious” music became the order of the day. To be sure, we studied and learned all the little pieces as instrumentalists and maybe we would play one as an encore, but gradually the ability to play short works languished.

Heifetz’s Brahms Concerto at the Hollywood Bowl was wonderful, but when as an encore he played a Hungarian Dance by the same composer, we smiled, relaxed and reveled in his special way with this kind of music.

What is so special about playing little pieces? I guess it’s like the difference between big novels and short stories. You have only a few minutes to reveal a character or a mood or a world. It’s not one bit easier than the big piece. In fact, in a way, it’s even harder. One false move and the mood is gone.

Now, here we are in the 21st century. Everyone talks about “sound bites,” and “15 minutes of fame.” Everyone talks about the graying of the classical music audience. Everyone talks about diversity and the many cultures of the world. What is the answer? I think you have found part of it. We can restore the sense of wonder of listeners by bringing them quickly into our special world. In their day Fritz Kreisler, Casals, Piatigorsky, Heifetz and countless others arranged short works of interesting character and presented them in a way that was compelling and attractive. You have chosen pieces from many coun- tries which express much about their people; you have fashioned them so the story gets told well. You bring a warm smile to the listener or astonishment that a clumsy old instrument like the cello can be maneuvered with lightning dexterity. [...]

"...the playing by Lipkind and his accompanist is outstanding: cleanly articulated; emotionally charged; in short, virtuosic ..." ****

Lee Passarella - Audiophile Audition.com - 28 February 2012




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