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LM 7406
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LM 7406

Igor Markevitch conducts Rimsky-Korsakov's The Golden Cockerel

The Classical Shop
release date: April 2009


Artists:

Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden


Igor Markevitch


Friedrich Dalberg

General Polkan (bass)

Howell Glynne

King Dodon (bass)

Geraint Evans

Prince Afron (baritone)

John Lanigan

Prince Guidon (tenor)

Hugues Cuenod

The astrologer (high tenor)

Mattiwilda Dobbs

The Queen of Shemakha (soprano)

Royal Opera Chorus



Venue:

Royal Opera House, Covent Garden

1954

Record Label
MP Live

Genre:

Opera




Total Time - 107:12
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NIKOLAI ANDREYEVICH RIMSKY-KORSAKOV

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The Golden Cockerel

 
1 Announcement 0:17
2 The astrologer’s preface 4:08
3 Dodon’s monologue 3:03
4 Prince Guidon’s plan 2:34
5 Prince Afron’s plan 4:43
6 Entrance of the astrologer and the golden cockerel 5:52
7 Scene with the parrot 5:06
8 Sleep of Dodon 7:31
9 Dream of Dodon 6:49
10 The summons to war 2:27
11 Soldiers’ chorus 6:45
12 Queen Shemakha’s entrance and hymn to the sun 16:14
13 Shemakha’s seduction of Dodon 11:03
14 Dance of Queen Shemakha 4:51
15 Chorus of slaves 2:18
16 Introduction and chorus of the people of Dodon 8:52
17 The wedding procession and reappearance of the astrologer 5:04
18 The death of Dodon 6:31
19 The astrologer’s epilogue 1:49
20 Applause 1:15
     
 Howell Glynne King Dodon (bass)
 Mattiwilda Dobbs The Queen of Shemakha (soprano)
 Hugues Cuenod The astrologer (high tenor)
 John Lanigan Prince Guidon (tenor)
 Geraint Evans Prince Afron (baritone)
 Friedrich Dalberg General Polkan (bass)
 Igor Markevitch
The last of the 14 operas by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov has always been his most popular. There is the humour, ranging from knockabout comedy to stinging satire as it uses Pushkin’s original short story to lampoon Tsarist manners and ambitions, as well as small-mindedness in the face of foreign cultures. There is the deftness and brevity of its construction a world away from the Parsfalian epic tone of his previous opera, The Invisible City of Kitezh. Rimsky had thought himself wrung and written out after completing the four hours of Kitezh, but along came the suggestion to adapt Pushkin’s tale, and the score was completed astonishingly quickly – within the space of nine months - and crucially, each bar tingling with the bright, edgy instrumental colour of which Rimsky had become such a master, and with a skill that Stravinsky would later draw on and appropriate.

Igor Markevitch was as renowned for his evocation of orchestral tone-colours on the podium as Rimsky was on the page, but opportunities to hear him in opera are few and far between. He is the perfect conductor for the Golden Cockerel: careful, unsentimental and everywhere alive to its wit and imagery. His singers are cast in depth, from the aptly penetrating soprano of Arda Mandikian as the eponymous bird whose cry warns of danger, to the extraordinarly secure top notes of Hugues Cuenod as the Astrologer. The revival of Golden Cockerel by the Royal Opera at Sadler’s Wells showed what a crowd-pleaser it is; now an equally captivating evening from half a century ago can be relived for the first time.

The last of the 14 operas by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov has always been his most popular. There is the humour, ranging from knockabout comedy to stinging satire as it uses Pushkin’s original short story to lampoon Tsarist manners and ambitions, as well as small-mindedness in the face of foreign cultures. There is the deftness and brevity of its construction a world away from the Parsfalian epic tone of his previous opera, The Invisible City of Kitezh. Rimsky had thought himself wrung and written out after completing the four hours of Kitezh, but along came the suggestion to adapt Pushkin’s tale, and the score was completed astonishingly quickly – within the space of nine months - and crucially, each bar tingling with the bright, edgy instrumental colour of which Rimsky had become such a master, and with a skill that Stravinsky would later draw on and appropriate.

Igor Markevitch was as renowned for his evocation of orchestral tone-colours on the podium as Rimsky was on the page, but opportunities to hear him in opera are few and far between. He is the perfect conductor for the Golden Cockerel: careful, unsentimental and everywhere alive to its wit and imagery. His singers are cast in depth, from the aptly penetrating soprano of Arda Mandikian as the eponymous bird whose cry warns of danger, to the extraordinarly secure top notes of Hugues Cuenod as the Astrologer. The revival of Golden Cockerel by the Royal Opera at Sadler’s Wells showed what a crowd-pleaser it is; now an equally captivating evening from half a century ago can be relived for the first time.

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