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LM 7407
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LM 7407

Rafael Kubelik conducts Jenufa

The Classical Shop
release date: April 2009


Artists:

BBC Opera Orchestra


Rafael Kubelik


Doris Doree

Grandmother Buryjovka (contralto)

Gre Brouwenstijn

Jenufa (soprano)

Mary Jarred

Kostelnicka Buryjovka (soprano)

John Lanigan

Laca Klemen (tenor)

Raymond Nilsson

Števa Buryja (tenor)

BBC Opera Chorus



Venue:

BBC Studios, London

1951

Record Label
MP Live

Genre:

Opera




Total Time - 107:12
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LEOS JANACEK

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Jenufa

 
1 How the twilight deepens 11:23
2 What might that be Laca? 4:47
3 Come now Jenufa 2:01
4 Steva! 8:28
5 Steva, Steva, I know what happened was you got drunk today 5:30
6 Suddenly there stood a wonderful Steva 4:17
7 Introduction 1:26
8 Why must the little door stand open a while 6:50
9 But, in only twenty weeks gone by 1:53
10 Dear Aunt Kostelnicka, you have sent this note to me 6:16
11 4:40
12 One moment…one moment 3:49
13 Mamma, my head is aching 8:59
14 My child, dead 2:31
15 But now, Steva 6:43
16 Introduction...Are you anxious Jenufa? 2:32
17 God be with you 3:33
18 There now, Laca 3:23
19 What now, they’re here 5:04
20 Take now my blessing 3:21
21 Now listen to me 2:44
22 Do not kneel, dearest mother 3:26
23 Finale 3:25
24 Announcement 0:11
     
 Gre Brouwenstijn Jenufa (soprano)
 Mary Jarred Kostelnicka Buryjovka (soprano)
 John Lanigan Laca Klemen (tenor)
 Raymond Nilsson Števa Buryja (tenor)
 Doris Doree Grandmother Buryjovka (contralto)
 Rafael Kubelik
The authority with which Rafael Kubelík conducted the music of his compatriot Janácek need not be rehearsed. His commercial recordings of the Sinfonietta and Glagolitic Mass stand at the top of most shortlists. It’s all the more extraordinary that Kubelík was never invited to record Janácek’s operas, which are his greatest and most affecting works – perhaps none more so than Jenufa, which received its first performance in 1904, almost a decade after Janácek had started work. The enthusiastic reception inspired him to resign from his teaching post and embark on an Indian summer of composition, though he had to wait another decade before finally gaining international recognition (at the age of 60) after the National Theatre of Prague finally granted long-withheld permission to stage Jenufa there.

This performance dates from several years before Kubelik’s important tenure as the musical director of the Royal Opera, though one can imagine this performance was instrumental in drawing attention to both the 37-year-old conductor and the opera itself: both were barely known in the UK at that point. Kubelik regarded presentation of opera in the local language as important to its comprehension and reception, and it is characteristic that he should have extended this insistence even to the works of his compatriot which are often thought near-untranslatable in their unity of speech-rhythm with musical idiom.

The success of this performance should persuade any doubters who have not heard Sir Charles Mackerras’s recent recording in English. Here, however, as well as a superbly idiomatic conductor, is one of the most powerful assumptions of the title role. Gré Brouwenstijn was a soprano in the true heroic mould, a favourite at Bayreuth and the Royal Opera among other houses, who was passed over by the record companies but whose live recorded legacy amply reveal what Grove notes as her ‘musical intelligence and natural dignity on stage’.

The authority with which Rafael Kubelík conducted the music of his compatriot Janácek need not be rehearsed. His commercial recordings of the Sinfonietta and Glagolitic Mass stand at the top of most shortlists. It’s all the more extraordinary that Kubelík was never invited to record Janácek’s operas, which are his greatest and most affecting works – perhaps none more so than Jenufa, which received its first performance in 1904, almost a decade after Janácek had started work. The enthusiastic reception inspired him to resign from his teaching post and embark on an Indian summer of composition, though he had to wait another decade before finally gaining international recognition (at the age of 60) after the National Theatre of Prague finally granted long-withheld permission to stage Jenufa there.

This performance dates from several years before Kubelik’s important tenure as the musical director of the Royal Opera, though one can imagine this performance was instrumental in drawing attention to both the 37-year-old conductor and the opera itself: both were barely known in the UK at that point. Kubelik regarded presentation of opera in the local language as important to its comprehension and reception, and it is characteristic that he should have extended this insistence even to the works of his compatriot which are often thought near-untranslatable in their unity of speech-rhythm with musical idiom.

The success of this performance should persuade any doubters who have not heard Sir Charles Mackerras’s recent recording in English. Here, however, as well as a superbly idiomatic conductor, is one of the most powerful assumptions of the title role. Gré Brouwenstijn was a soprano in the true heroic mould, a favourite at Bayreuth and the Royal Opera among other houses, who was passed over by the record companies but whose live recorded legacy amply reveal what Grove notes as her ‘musical intelligence and natural dignity on stage’.

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