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LM 7410
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LM 7410

Charles Mackerras conducts Venus & Adonis and Savitri

The Classical Shop
release date: April 2009


Artists:

English Opera Group Orchestra


Sir Charles Mackerras


Maria Szell

Cupid (soprano)

Thomas Hemsley

Death (baritone)

Peter Pears

Satyavan (tenor)

Arda Mandikian

Savitri (soprano)

Heather Harper

Venus (soprano)

Chorus of the English Opera Group



Venue:

Jubilee Hall, Aldeburgh

1956

Record Label
MP Live

Genre:

Opera




Total Time - 89:45
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JOHN BLOW

 

Venus & Adonis

 
1 Announcement 0:16
     
2 Introduction by Alec Robertson 5:36
     
3 Overture: Maestoso – Allegro – Tempo primo 2:54
     
4 Act 1 Tune: Lento 1:31
     
5 Venus! Adonis! 1:56
     
6 Hark, hark, the rural music sounds 3:23
     
7 Come follow, follow, follow 2:23
     
8 Dance 1:00
     
9 Act 2 Tune: Allegretto 1:48
     
10 You place with such delightful care 3:25
     
11 Choose the formal fool 1:48
     
12 Dance of Cupids 0:45
     
13 Call, call the Graces 3:36
     
14 Dances of The Graces 6:23
     
15 Act 3 Tune: Sostenuto 2:33
     
16 Adonis, uncall’d-for sighs 3:26
     
17 Ah, I could well endure the pointed dart 2:50
     
18 Ah! Adonis my love 1:59
     
19 With solemn pomp 2:00
     
20 Mourn for thy servant 4:31
     
21 Closing announcement 0:38
 Heather Harper Venus (soprano)
 Maria Szell Cupid (soprano)
     
 

GUSTAV HOLST

 

Savitri

 
22 Announcement 0:18
     
23 Introduction by Imogen Holst 3:37
     
24 Savitri! Savitri! I am Death 5:53
     
25 Greeting to thee, my loving Savitri 0:19
     
26 The forest is to me a mirror 1:21
     
27 Love to the lover 0:45
     
28 Once I knew Maya 1:22
     
29 Savitri! Savitri! 0:35
     
30 I am with thee 2:18
     
31 Savitri! Savitri! I am Death 0:54
     
32 Welcome, Lord 1:05
     
33 Thine is the holiness 1:31
     
34 Then enter, Lord 2:51
     
35 Give me life 2:32
     
36 Death, the Just One 2:29
     
37 Loneliness and pain are ended 0:42
     
38 Savitri! Is it thou? 2:45
     
39 Unto his kingdom 1:22
     
40 I am with thee 1:59
     
41 Closing announcement 0:26
 Arda Mandikian Savitri (soprano)
 Peter Pears Satyavan (tenor)
 Thomas Hemsley Death (baritone)
 Sir Charles Mackerras
Several of Music Preserved’s releases are of revivals: works that we take for granted now as part of the fabric of musical culture but had been forgotten over the ages. Venus and Adonis was only revived in 1920, in Glastonbury, and still counted as a slight and obscure entertainment when it was presented by the fledgling Aldeburgh Festival, in a staging at the tiny Jubilee Hall. This hall, much maligned over the years, was the ideal space for so intimate a work, as noted by both Alec Robertson in the broadcast introduction and by John Steane in his booklet note.

Now we recognise Venus and Adonis both as the influential predecessor to Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas, in narrative, structure and even musical content, and as a beautifully written, psychologically acute masque in its own right. Some of that recognition at least is due to the success of the present performance, and the championship of Imogen Holst (who edited and promoted the score) and Charles Mackerras, who conducted it with such élan and prescient understanding of an idiom still being explored.

The sparse but perfectly judged companion was the chamber opera by Imogen’s father, Gustav. The music creates in Savitri herself, as John Steane remarks, a woman with the strength of inner calm and (remarkably achieved in so short a space) a wonderfully complete sensibility, the great depth of her emotions not precluding the prompt use of an alert intelligence. The coupling, albeit unusual, is no less striking or effective, and the sense of joining the audience in the Jubilee Hall over half a century ago is palpable.

Several of Music Preserved’s releases are of revivals: works that we take for granted now as part of the fabric of musical culture but had been forgotten over the ages. Venus and Adonis was only revived in 1920, in Glastonbury, and still counted as a slight and obscure entertainment when it was presented by the fledgling Aldeburgh Festival, in a staging at the tiny Jubilee Hall. This hall, much maligned over the years, was the ideal space for so intimate a work, as noted by both Alec Robertson in the broadcast introduction and by John Steane in his booklet note.

Now we recognise Venus and Adonis both as the influential predecessor to Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas, in narrative, structure and even musical content, and as a beautifully written, psychologically acute masque in its own right. Some of that recognition at least is due to the success of the present performance, and the championship of Imogen Holst (who edited and promoted the score) and Charles Mackerras, who conducted it with such élan and prescient understanding of an idiom still being explored.

The sparse but perfectly judged companion was the chamber opera by Imogen’s father, Gustav. The music creates in Savitri herself, as John Steane remarks, a woman with the strength of inner calm and (remarkably achieved in so short a space) a wonderfully complete sensibility, the great depth of her emotions not precluding the prompt use of an alert intelligence. The coupling, albeit unusual, is no less striking or effective, and the sense of joining the audience in the Jubilee Hall over half a century ago is palpable.

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