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NA 6787
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NA 6787

CHILL WITH HANDEL

The Classical Shop
release date: August 2008

Originally recorded in 2008

Artists:

Drottningholm Baroque Ensemble


Capella Istropolitana


London Baroque


City of London Sinfonia


European Union Baroque Orchestra


Frankfurt Baroque Orchestra


Jozef Kopelman


Bradley Creswick


Joachim Carlos Martini


Jeremy Summerly


Charles Medlam



Annette Reinhold

contralto

David Bates

counter-tenor

oboe

Julia Girdwood

oboe

Camden

oboe

organ

Laszlo Czidra

recorder

soprano

Elisabeth Scholl

soprano

Claron McFadden

soprano

Elizabeth Franklin-Kitchen

soprano

Kym Amps

soprano

Barbara Schlick

soprano

Helen Parker

soprano

Edward Lyon

tenor

trumpet

Junge Kantorei



Producer:

unge Kantorei e. V.


Bill Sykes


Jonathan Freeman-Attwood



Engineer:

David Harries


Mike Skeet


Richard Millard



Record Label
Naxos

Genre:

Classical




Total Time - 61:45
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GEORGE FRIDERIC HANDEL

Select Complete Single Disc for
     
1 

Apollo e Dafne, HWV 122

5:33
  soprano
     
2 

Messiah, HWV 56

0:59
 
     
3 

Water Piece in D major, HWV 341

1:58
  trumpet
     
4 

Oboe Concerto No. 3 in G minor, HWV 287

3:03
  Camden oboe
 Julia Girdwood oboe
     
5 

Recorder Sonata in F major, Op. 1, No. 11, HWV 369

2:22
  soprano
 Laszlo Czidra recorder
     
6 

Concerto Grosso in B minor, Op. 6, No. 12, HWV 330

3:43
 
 Jozef Kopelman
     
7 

Il Trionfo del Tempo e della Verita (The Triumph of Time and Truth), HWV 46b

6:02
 Claron McFadden soprano
 Elisabeth Scholl soprano
 Joachim Carlos Martini
     
8 

Concerto Grosso in A minor, Op. 6, No. 4, HWV 322

2:34
 
 Jozef Kopelman
     
9 

Organ Concerto No. 1 in G minor, Op. 4, No. 1, HWV 289

4:00
  organ
 Bradley Creswick
     
10 

Messiah, HWV 56

6:08
 Kym Amps soprano
     
11 

Concerto Grosso in A minor, Op. 6, No. 4, HWV 322

2:34
 
 Jozef Kopelman
     
12 

My Heart is inditing, HWV 261

3:10
 Elizabeth Franklin-Kitchen soprano
 Edward Lyon tenor
 David Bates counter-tenor
 Jeremy Summerly
     
13 

Atalanta, HWV 35

2:39
  oboe
     
14 

Athalia, HWV 52

2:14
 Annette Reinhold contralto
 Barbara Schlick soprano
 Joachim Carlos Martini
     
15 

Concerto Grosso in D major, Op. 6, No. 5, HWV 323

2:37
 
 Jozef Kopelman
     
16 

Messiah, HWV 56

5:13
 Helen Parker soprano
     
17 

Organ Concerto No. 4 in F major, Op. 4, No. 4, HWV 292

3:15
  organ
 Bradley Creswick
     
18 

Rinaldo, HWV 7

3:41
  soprano
 Charles Medlam


Chill with Handel
 
Born in the German town of Halle in 1685, Handel studied briefly at the University of Halle before moving to Hamburg in 1703, where he served as a violinist in the opera orchestra and subsequently as harpsichordist and composer. He spent from 1706 until 1710 in Italy, where he further developed his mastery of Italian musical style. Appointed Kapellmeister to the future George I of England, he visited London, where he composed the first London opera Rinaldo in 1710 and settled there two years later. He enjoyed aristocratic and later royal patronage, and was occupied largely with the composition of Italian opera with varying financial success until the 1740s. He was successful in developing a new form, English oratorio, which combined the musical felicities of the Italian operatic style with an increased role for the chorus, relative economy of production and the satisfaction of a  religious text in English, elements that appealed to the English Protestant sensibilities of the time. In London he won the greatest esteem and exercised an influence that tended to overshadow the achievements of his contemporaries and immediate successors. He died in London in 1759 and was buried in Westminster Abbey in the presence of some 3000 mourners.
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