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NA 6801
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NA 6801

Classics at the Movies: Sci-Fi

The Classical Shop
release date: August 2008

Originally recorded in 2008

Artists:

Capella Istropolitana


Antoni Wit



organ

Jeno Jando

piano

Bernd Glemser

piano

Luba Orgonasova

soprano

Record Label
Naxos

Genre:

Classical




Total Time - 66:00
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1 

Also sprach Zarathustra, Op. 30, TrV 176

1:53
 
     
 

Star Wars, Episode IV, "A New Hope"

 
2 Main Title Theme 5:25
 
     
3 Princess Leia's Theme 4:36
 
     
4 Cantina Band 2:19
 
     
5 The Throne Room 6:45
 
     
6 

Star Wars Episode VI, "Return of the Jedi"

4:18
 
     
 

GOLDSMITH

7 

Alien

4:45
 
     
 

8 

Serenade No. 13 in G major, K. 525, "Eine kleine Nachtmusik" (Alien)

5:56
 
     
 

GAETANO DONIZETTI

9 

Lucia di Lammermoor

4:00
 Luba Orgonasova soprano
     
 

COURAGE

10 

Star Trek

3:07
 
     
 

11 

Star Trek IV, "The Voyage Home"

2:49
 
     
 

FRANZ JOSEPH HAYDN

12 

String Quartet No. 53 in D major, Op. 64, No. 5, Hob.III:63, "The Lark" (Star Trek: Insurrection)

2:19
 
     
 

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN

13 

Piano Sonata No. 8 in C minor, Op. 13, "Pathetique"

4:47
 Jeno Jando piano
     
 

14 

Rhapsody on a Theme by Paganini, Op. 43

2:58
 Bernd Glemser piano
 Antoni Wit
     
 

JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH

15 

Toccata & Fugue in D minor, BWV 565

10:03
  organ


The Classics at the Movies
 
Ever since the advent of talkies there has been a continuing debate on the nature and function of film music. For many it should be heard but not noticed. It should induce certain emotions but not obtrude on the consciousness of the audience. Yet it should be able to invest a scene with a variety of feelings, terror, grandeur, misery or gaiety. To understand what good film music can do for a film there is a simple test. If scenes from a film are shown with and without music, it will immediately be clear that good music can affect the feelings of an audience, without their being conscious of it.
 
If the function of film music has been the subject of debate, there can, nevertheless, be no doubt that the nature of this music has changed very considerably over the years. Before the advent of talkies all cinemas had their own house pianists to provide music at every performance, illustrating the action on the screen. In the heyday of Hollywood film music was big business, with major studios turning out hundreds of films a year and having under full-time contract large orchestras. There were also many composers, orchestrators and song-writers attached to each studio. These were the golden thirties, forties and, to an extent, the fifties, with names like Max Steiner, Erich Wolfgang Korngold and Alfred Newman, all with a European background, writing big scores for a string of Errol Flynn pictures and for films like The Mark of Zorro and The Prisoner of Zenda.
 
Steiner, Korngold and Newman were followed by a succession of American composers like Henry Mancini, the composer of the Pink Panther music, Elmer Bernstein, Jerry Goldsmith and John Williams. Gradually, however, the really ambitious scores vanished or were reserved for multi-million-dollar projects. More and more films had to make do with loosely strung together pop tunes, or, in an increasing number of cases, more or less well chosen themes from classical music. In some cases the use of a piece of music in a film had a very considerable effect, as, for example, the use of Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 21, now popularly known as the Elvira Madigan Concerto.
 
In the Naxos Classics at the Movies series we have gathered together many classical themes used in popular films. All of these well deserve a hearing in their own right, but they may also remind the listener of a favourite film or two.
 
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