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NN 0891
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NN 0891

MONROE, Marilyn: Original Recordings (Love, Marilyn) (1953-1958)

The Classical Shop
release date: May 2010


Artists:

Alfred Newman Orchestra


Hollywood Symphony Orchestra


Studio orchestra


Alfred Newman


Matty Malneck


Earle Hagen


Lionel Newman


Anonymous


Hal Schaefer

piano

Studio choir


Studio chorus



Engineer:

Alan Bunting



Record Label
Naxos

Genre:

Nostalgia




Total Time - 58:38
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Select Complete Single Disc for
 

JULE STYNE / LEO ROBIN

 

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

 
1 Gentlemen Prefer Blondes: A Little Girl from Little Rock 3:03
 Lionel Newman
     
2 Gentlemen Prefer Blondes: Diamonds are a girl's best friend 3:30
 Lionel Newman
     
 

HAROLD ADAMSON / HOAGY CARMICHAEL

3 Gentlemen Prefer Blondes: When love goes wrong (Nothing goes right) 3:27
 Lionel Newman
     
 

JULE STYNE / LEO ROBIN

4 Gentlemen Prefer Blondes: Bye, bye Baby 3:27
 Lionel Newman
     
 

BUDDY G. DESYLVA / GEORGE GERSHWIN

5 

The French Doll

3:12
 Earle Hagen
     
 

HAVEN GILLESPIE / LIONEL NEWMAN

6 

Niagara

2:58
 Earle Hagen
     
 

KEN DARBY / LIONEL NEWMAN

 

The River of No Return

 
7 The River of No Return: I'm gonna file my claim 2:39
 Hal Schaefer piano
 Lionel Newman
     
8 The River of No Return: The river of no return 2:17
 Lionel Newman
     
 

ALFRED NEWMAN

9 

Street Scene

2:56
 Alfred Newman
     
 

IRVING BERLIN

 

There's No Business Like Show Business

 
10 You'd be surprised 3:03
 Lionel Newman
     
11 Heat wave 4:05
 Lionel Newman
     
12 Lazy 3:34
 Lionel Newman
     
13 After you get what you want (You don't want it) 3:34
 Lionel Newman
     
 

ALTON DELMORE

14 

She Acts Like a Woman Should

2:46
  Anonymous
     
 

DOROTHY FIELDS / JEROME KERN

15 

Swing Time

2:20
  Anonymous
     
 

ALFRED NEWMAN

16 

The Seven Year Itch

3:55
 Alfred Newman
     
 

A. HARRINGTON GIBBS / JOE GREY / LEO WOOD

17 

Runnin' Wild

1:04
 Matty Malneck
     
 

BERT KALMAR / HARRY RUBY / HERBERT STOTHART

18 

Good Boy

2:56
 Matty Malneck
     
 

GUS KAHN / JAY LIVINGSTON / MATTY MALNECK

19 

Some Like It Hot: I'm thru with Love

2:31
 Matty Malneck
     
 

I.A.L. DIAMOND / MATTY MALNECK

20 

Some Like It Hot

1:21
 Matty Malneck


No one remembers Marilyn Monroe primarily as a singer.
 
That would be like recalling Margaret Thatcher as a fashion model. Everyone agrees that Monroe was a gorgeous creature, a superb comedienne, a potentially great actress and a tragic individual whose numerous personal problems helped bring about her most untimely end.
 
But you wouldn’t call her one of the great vocalists of her time. This was the era of Doris Day and Patti Page, bright clear voices without a hint of shadow, girls who wouldn’t know a double meaning if it hit them over the head. Monroe, on the other hand, was all innuendo, a lass who could get more sexual undercurrents into a song than anyone since Mae West.
 
No, you can’t picture MM singing “Que Sera, Sera” or “How Much Is That Doggy in the Window?” but within her own, carefully chosen, very narrow range, she could be very effective.
 It’s interesting to note that a lot of Monroe impersonators (of both genders!) zero in on her musical renditions when they want to deliver an amusing portrait of the blonde bombshell. Why? Maybe it’s because it was when she sang that Marilyn became the most Marilynesque. The breathiness was breathier, the sexiness was sexier and that wry air of self-mockery, which elevated her above the Jayne Mansfields and Mamie Van Dorens of the world, was served up with added emphasis.
 
Marilyn sings on eighteen of the twenty selections presented here, spanning a fairly limited period, from 1953 to 1959, but it was within this window that most of her Hollywood vocals were recorded, a period of time generally acknowledged to contain her best work.- Richard Ouzounian
 
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