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SIG 171
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SIG 171

Works for Cello and Piano

The Classical Shop
release date: September 2009

Originally recorded in 2009

Artists:

Matthew Barley

cello

Julian Joseph

piano

Venue:

Champs Hill, Sussex



Producer:

Raphael Mouterde



Engineer:

Mike Hatch



Record Label
Signum

Genre:

Chamber




Total Time - 68:24
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BARLEY/JOSEPH

1 

Improvisation #7

1:40
   
 

JACO PASTORIUS

2 

(Used to be a) Cha Cha

5:33
   
 

BARLEY/JOSEPH

3 

Improviation #3

5:36
   
 

JULIAN JOSEPH

4 

Castellain Sunshine

8:47
   
 

ANTONIO CARLOS JOBIM

5 

Sabia

3:31
   
 

JULIAN JOSEPH

6 

Dance of the Three Legged Elephants

11:53
   
 

MAURICE RAVEL

7 

Piece en Forme de Habanera

4:23
   
 

JOHN MCLAUGHLIN

8 

Miles Beyond

9:57
   
 

JULIAN JOSEPH

9 

Vika

11:40
   
 

BARLEY/JOSEPH

10 

Improvisation #2

5:24


Dazzling yet intimate, this set of tracks is the work of two brilliant and internationally renowned musicians who are also close friends, and their friendship pours from the music with passion, intensity, humour and inspiring energy. The central focus here is ‘collaboration’ – the musical collaboration of Barley and Joseph and the traditions from which they have individually evolved, and their combined collaboration with other composers in a series of imaginative arrangements.

"... Some of the music is composed, and some improvised in the jazz fashion. Both players strive to bring together jazz and classical, and feel that boundaries should not exist.Many of the tunes follow the usual modern jazz treatment of stating the main tune directly, and then taking off on variations upon it which feature one or the other instrument in the main role but switching back and forth. The longest track on the CD is the title tune by pianist Joseph, running nearly 12 minutes. It is a witty ¾-time opus in 12-bar form and the piano contributes some great jazz lines. I was reminded of Stravinsky’s witty dance that he wrote for the Ringling Bros. elephants, except that this one doesn’t quote Schubert’s Marche Militare and is less classically-influenced."  ****
 
John Sunier - Audiophile Audition - 8 January 2013

                                      Record of the Month

“ … the recording beguiles and overwhelms alternately - sometimes simultaneously”

 Brian Wilson -  MusicWeb-International.com -


"The young virtuoso of the cello has been straddling styles and fields of activity for a while, but this is probably his most jazz oriented venture yet. Barley’s execution and quality of invention are exceptional and, even though there’s occasional use of extended techniques (as opposed to “effects”), most excitement is achieved via a conventional approach, much of it with the bow rather than pizzicato. Joseph, heard at album length for the first time in too long, is obviously expert and equally successful at taking the role of sensitive accompanist a lot of the time. Some tracks are classified as improvisations but the majority are identifiable pieces, often with highly singable melodies. Even when auditioning initially without benefit of a set-list, the Ravel ‘Pièce en Forme de Habañera’ stuck out as being played more “straight” than the rest, but its presence here underlines the stylistic continuity with Jobim, McLaughlin and even Jaco Pastorius’ ‘Used To Be A Cha Cha’."

Brian Priestley - Jazzwise Magazine - October 2009




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