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WH 0020
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WH 0020

Songs by Schubert, Wolf, Debussy, Duparc and Warlock

The Classical Shop
release date: November 2007

Originally recorded in 2007

Artists:

Christopher Maltman

baritone

Julius Drake

piano

Venue:

Wigmore Hall, London



Producer:

Jeremy Hayes



Engineer:

Tony Faulkner



Record Label
Wigmore Hall

Genre:

Piano


Vocal & Song

Total Time - 60:04
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FRANZ SCHUBERT

(1797-1828)
1 

Der Wanderer

5:11
2 

Wandrers Nachtlied 1

2:01
3 

Rastlose Liebe

1:16
4 

Wandrers Nachtlied 2

2:45
   
 

HUGO WOLF

(1860-1903)
5 

Der Feuerreiter

5:20
6 

Der Gärtner

1:24
7 

An die Geliebte

3:14
8 

Fußreise

2:40
9 

Der Rattenfänger

3:08
   
 

CLAUDE DEBUSSY

(1862-1918)
10 

Romance

1:59
11 

Les cloches

2:04
12 

Mandoline

1:51
   
 

HENRI DUPARC

(1848-1933)
13 

L'Inviation au voyage

4:18
14 

La vague et la cloche

5:12
15 

Phidylé

6:13
   
 

PETER WARLOCK

(1894-1930)
16 

The Fox

2:37
17 

The Singer

1:35
18 

Captain Stratton's Fancy

2:09
   
  encore  
19 announcement 0:38
   
20 

Misalliance

4:29
Christopher Maltman, Julius Drake

At the end of his recital, Christopher Maltman apologized to the audience for only being able to offer one encore because, as he put it: ‘I've had a bit of a throat thing all week.’ That Maltman was under the weather had, indeed, been apparent. He coughed and cleared his throat from time to time between songs. At one point, a pulse intruded on his dark, weighty baritone.

None of this mattered very much. Maltman slightly off form is better than many singers at their best. He has always been prepared to take risks, and is such a superb communicator that one willingly forgives the occasional inequality. In a group of Wolf songs, he segued in a flash from the nightmare intensity of Der Feuerreiter to the whimsical Der Gärtner.

He was wonderful in French songs, too, where his dark voice is often strangely disturbing. In Duparc, he avoids the breathy, overtly sexy approach adopted by many, hinting at deeper ambivalences within the music. Listening to him sing L'Invitation au Voyage, you end up wondering just exactly what the nature of the relationship is between the narrator and a beloved whom he calls ‘my child, my sister’. La Vague et la Cloche, meanwhile, was a tour de force of baleful intensity, in which Maltman was superbly aided by his pianist Julius Drake. That one encore, meanwhile, was Flanders and Swann's Misalliance - funny, bitingly satirical, and faultlessly done. Tim Ashley, The Guardian Tuesday 19 June 2007.



"A tour de force of baleful intensity, in which Maltman was superbly aided by his pianist Julius Drake"
 

The Guardian



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